Roger Goodell’s NFL is soft on crime, big on virtue-signaling

Apr 3, 2024 | U.S. | 0 comments

While the NFL has gotten its panties in a twist over tackling, it don’t seem to mind if the players commit legitimate crimes off the field.

In 2007, Roger Goodell was pressured into becoming the law and order commissioner in order to address the bad behavior of NFL players. 17 years later, it’s quite clear it isn’t working out.

Most recently, Kansas City Chiefs wide receiver Rashee Rice and former Lions defensive back Cam Sutton were wanted fugitives for serious crimes.

Rice was involved in a car chase that led to an accident that put lives at risk. Sutton had been wanted for several weeks in Florida for his involvement in a domestic violence issue before turning himself in.

“The only thing that has changed since 2007 is corporate media and Mike Florio were incentivized to pick new topics,” Jason Whitlock says, disappointed. “NFL player conduct policy, a complete and total failure. Nothing’s changed.”

Steve Kim agrees, saying that the media has given NFL players “not just kid-gloves treatment, but hands-off treatment of those who break the law.”

“We’re not talking about speeding tickets or just moving violations or parking tickets, we’re talking about putting other lives in danger,” Kim says.

Kim believes this is reflective of the social justice obsession that’s plagued the NFL over the past five or six years.

“Crime is now about the past, it is not about individual responsibility. It’s about generational trauma and all these other terms that they’re going to jin up to basically excuse the behavior and place no accountability on the individuals,” he explains.

Want more from Jason Whitlock?

To enjoy more fearless conversations at the crossroads of culture, faith, sports, and comedy with Jason Whitlock, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution, and live the American dream.

While the NFL has gotten its panties in a twist over tackling, it don’t seem to mind if the players commit legitimate crimes off the field.

In 2007, Roger Goodell was pressured into becoming the law and order commissioner in order to address the bad behavior of NFL players. 17 years later, it’s quite clear it isn’t working out.

Most recently, Kansas City Chiefs wide receiver Rashee Rice and former Lions defensive back Cam Sutton were wanted fugitives for serious crimes.

Rice was involved in a car chase that led to an accident that put lives at risk. Sutton had been wanted for several weeks in Florida for his involvement in a domestic violence issue before turning himself in.

“The only thing that has changed since 2007 is corporate media and Mike Florio were incentivized to pick new topics,” Jason Whitlock says, disappointed. “NFL player conduct policy, a complete and total failure. Nothing’s changed.”

Steve Kim agrees, saying that the media has given NFL players “not just kid-gloves treatment, but hands-off treatment of those who break the law.”

“We’re not talking about speeding tickets or just moving violations or parking tickets, we’re talking about putting other lives in danger,” Kim says.

Kim believes this is reflective of the social justice obsession that’s plagued the NFL over the past five or six years.

“Crime is now about the past, it is not about individual responsibility. It’s about generational trauma and all these other terms that they’re going to jin up to basically excuse the behavior and place no accountability on the individuals,” he explains.
Want more from Jason Whitlock?To enjoy more fearless conversations at the crossroads of culture, faith, sports, and comedy with Jason Whitlock, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution, and live the American dream.[#item_full_content]

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